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  • Top anti-drug body recommends pot decriminalization

    But public security minister remains strongly opposed to easing guidelines on possession of up to 25 grams of cannabis
    Times of Israel (Israel)
    Monday, December 12, 2016

    israel-cannabisMinister of Public Security Gilad Erdan is expected to deliver a formal dressing down to the heads of Israel’s leading anti-drug organization after the latter, at a Knesset meeting, came out in favor of decriminalizing the possession of small amounts of marijuana. Speaking at the Knesset’s Special Committee on Drug and Alcohol Abuse, top representatives from the Israel Anti-Drug Authority recommended that the possession of up to 25 grams of marijuana should not be treated as a criminal offense. (See also: Is Israel on the way to decriminalizing marijuana?)

  • Chuck promises Rastas speedy approval of ganja requests

    On the matter of temples the minister warned that the establishment of religious buildings is governed by law
    Jamaica Observer (Jamaica)
    Monday, December 12, 2016

    jamaica rastaJustice Minister Delroy Chuck has moved to assure members of the Rastafarian faith in Jamaica that their requests to transport ganja to be smoked as a religious sacrament will be granted expeditiously. This follows a demonstration late last month by irate Rastafarians in front of the Barnett Street Police Station in the wake of the seizure by police of 10 pounds of the weed from a member of the faith. “Where, unfortunately, a lot of you (Rastas) are getting into trouble is to get it (ganja) from where you buy it, or where you grow it, to the temple or to your home. You need an exemption. If you are going to transport it at all, just write me to get the exemption. I will approve it within hours,” the justice minister guaranteed.

  • Make heroin available on prescription, official UK drug advisers say

    Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs also suggests supervised injecting rooms to combat rising number of drug deaths
    The Guardian (UK)
    Monday, December 12, 2016

    uk-heroin-injectingHeroin on prescription and supervised injecting rooms are among a range of measures that the government’s drug advisers have suggested to reverse the UK’s soaring numbers of drug deaths. Responding to a sharp rise in the number of heroin-related deaths in recent years, the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs said maintenance of drug treatment programmes was essential to prevent further increases. Overdoses hit record levels in England and Wales last year sparking criticism of the government’s approach to drugs and addiction services. (See also: UK's first 'fix room' for heroin addicts to open in Glasgow)

  • Colombian leader: "It makes no sense" to jail peasant over marijuana

    He wouldn’t be against legalizing drugs if the world viewed it as a solution
    CBS News (US)
    Sunday, December 11, 2016

    santos-thumb-upColombian President Juan Manuel Santos used the Nobel podium in Norway to reiterate his call to "rethink" the war on drugs. "It makes no sense to imprison a peasant who grows marijuana, when nowadays, its cultivation and use are legal in eight states of the United States," he said. The decades-old war on drugs has produced enormous violence and environ­mental damage in nations that supply cocaine, and needs to be supplanted by a global focus on easing laws prohibiting consumption. His remarks reflected views he’s held as far back as at least 2012, when he discussed his ideas for new approaches in the drug war in a Guardian interview.

  • Pills that kill: why are thousands dying from fentanyl abuse?

    Fentanyl is a painkiller that is 50 times stronger than heroin. It has already killed thousands
    The Observer (UK)
    Sunday, December 11, 2016

    fentanyl-epidemicFentanyl is the latest and most disturbing twist in the epidemic of opioid addiction that has crept across the United States over the past two decades, claiming close to 200,000 lives. Fentanyl is a painkiller that is 50 times stronger than heroin. Prince, like almost all fentanyl’s victims, probably never even knew he was taking the drug. The ingredients for fentanyl are openly available in China and easily imported ready for manufacture. In September, the DEA issued a warning about the rise of a fentanyl variant that is 100 times more powerful – carfentanil, a drug used to tranquilise elephants. (See also: The fentanyl crisis is so deadly in Canada that even funeral directors need the antidote)

  • New medical marijuana research could greenlight more uses in treatment

    Though the US Drug Enforcement Agency hasn’t reclassified marijuana, easier availability of the drug for study has the potential to unearth new medical uses
    The Guardian (UK)
    Saturday, December 10, 2016

    Despite its continuing hardline stance against marijuana, the US Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) has shown some signs of relenting and this summer opened the door to allowing more farms to grow cannabis for official research purposes. That’s an important step forward that may change the potential marijuana has for medical treatment. Up to this point, researchers have had to depend on just one farm at the University of Mississippi to supply cannabis for all studies.

  • Ottawa moves to facilitate more injection sites as death toll climbs

    More than 622 people have died of illicit drug overdose deaths in B.C alone
    The Globe and Mail (Canada)
    Saturday, December 10, 2016

    Ottawa will introduce a bill that is expected to reduce barriers to opening and operating supervised drug-con­sumption sites in Canada. The move comes after B.C. announced it would open several “overdose prevention sites” without federal approval as an emergency measure to counter the province’s highest death toll on record due to illicit drugs. As well, carfentanil – a powerful synthetic opioid more toxic than fentanyl – has now been detected in three provinces and is beginning to fuel another surge in overdoses, creating a new sense of urgency.

  • 7 reasons President Trump is unlikely to fight legal marijuana

    A look at why it would be hard to stop what the states have started
    Time (US)
    Thursday, December 8, 2016

    With Donald Trump nominating Cabinet members who have spoken out against legal marijuana, some are arguing that the war on drugs may make a comeback. But while there’s reason for anxiety among those selling recreational marijuana legally in states like Colorado and Washington, an all-out war remains unlikely. Experts say that trying to undo legalization at this point would come with serious economic and political hurdles.

  • The next big bubble could be in Canada’s soaring pot market

    The capital pouring into the sector is likened to the dot com craze of the 1990s
    The Globe and Mail / Bloomberg News (Canada)
    Thursday, December 8, 2016

    cannabis-investingThe surge of capital into Canada’s nascent marijuana industry has sent stock prices soaring – and brought warnings it’s a bubble that could soon burst. The value of 26 marijuana stocks listed in Canada has swelled to almost $4-billion from close to nothing in the past two years, as investors rushed to bet on the country’s move toward legalizing recreational use. While investor optimism is being fueled by analysts’ estimates that there could be about 3.8 million recreational marijuana users in Canada by 2021 and billions in sales, there’s mounting concern companies are overvalued. (See also: Canada’s reefer madness reaches new heights as rivals merge)

  • 'They are slaughtering us like animals'

    Inside President Rodrigo Duterte’s brutal antidrug campaign in the Philippines
    The New York Times (US)
    Wednesday, December 7, 2016

    I had come to document the bloody and chaotic cam­paign against drugs that President Rodrigo Duterte began when he took office on June 30: since then, about 2,000 people had been slain at the hands of the police alone. What I experienced in the Philippines felt like a new level of ruthlessness: police officers' summari­ly shooting anyone suspected of dealing or even using drugs, vigilantes' taking seriously Mr. Duterte's call to "slaughter them all." Beyond those killed in official drug operations, the Philippine National Police have counted more than 3,500 unsolved homicides since July 1, turning much of the country into a macabre house of mourning. 

     

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